Dark Tales from the Den -Dona Fox

Dark Tales from the Den by [Fox, Dona]

Dona Fox has crept into my life and embedded herself as one of my favourite authors. Her writing style is exquisite, drawing the reader in with a fierce intensity and the delivering an utter gut punch of a finale.

Dark Tales from the Den is no different, a brilliantly executed collection of short horror tales that send real chills down my spine.

There are too many great stories within this collection to pick one, I could never do any of them justice with my words.

If you haven’t read any of the works of Dona Fox then you must go out and do so this evening! You won’t regret it!!

Enjoy

Grab your copy here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00W0DIMCS/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

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They Kill – Book Review – Flame Tree Press

Flame Tree Press are really putting out some great reads. They Kill from Tim Waggoner is a crazy trip through the inner workings of the psyche.

I’m always afraid of saying too much and giving the story away, so I think for this particular book I won’t say anything more than READ IT! It’s a lunatic ride… Tim Waggoner really takes his readers on a journey through madness. The underbelly of civilised society, it’s a dark perspective of our deepest desires, that which we hide and tuck away in a corner never to be seen. We see ‘regular’ people turning to their reverse selfs, doing the things they never would think then would or they could.

This is a gore filled tale, very graphic but I never felt once that it was out of place.

It’s a fun read, one that will hook you in and keep you guessing.

Check it out here:

They Kill (Fiction Without Frontiers) https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1787582566/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_LvacDbECCNSSS

One By One – Book Review

One by One – D. W. Gillespie

Flame Tree Press, 2019

The Easton family has just moved into their new fixer-upper, a beautiful old house that they bought at a steal, and Alice, the youngest of the family, is excited to explore the strange, new place. Her excitement turns to growing dread as she discovers a picture hidden under the old wallpaper, a child’s drawing of a family just like hers. 

Soon after, members of the family begin to disappear, each victim marked on the child’s drawing with a dark black X. It’s up to her to unlock the grim mystery of the house before she becomes the next victim.

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I was hooked from the opening with this book, a very intricately woven family horror tale, narrated by the wise beyond her years Alice. At just 10 years old she is left to uncover the truth behind a sinister wall painting and find out just what is happening to her family.

The story begins with the family arriving at their new house, an absolute “steal” according to Frank, Alice’s father. Frank is prone to whimsical schemes and a bit of a dreamer, so when he buys this house it’s not surprising that the rest of the family isn’t exactly convinced.

Alice seems to connect on anther level with the house, she has her own narration of events in her head, from ‘Mary’, a girl who tragically died in the house. She know’s deep down that something is wrong and that something dark is t work, but she just can’t put her finger on it. When she finds the picture of the previous family under the wallpaper her suspicions seem to take on their own energy. A stick figure family, mother, father, son, daughter and the family pet – just the same as Alice’s family.

Their pet cat vanishes and at the same time a mysterious ‘X’ is drawn over the pet in the picture. The an ‘X’ is drawn over the boy, representing her brother Dean. Just what is happening to Alice’s family and what does ‘Mary’ have to do with it.

I love the mis-direct within the story – the reader is convinced it’s one thing happening when in fact it’s something even more sinister. The story of Mary and just what happened to her is an interesting and tragic tale. We get snippets throughout thanks to Mary’s diary after Alice comes across in and has to read it. It is a very well put together narrative, very clever yet simple at the same time, and for me, the characters, particularly Alice, really set this off.

One by One is my second read from D. W. Gillespie (thanks to Flame Tree Press for the eARC). I look forward to more.

All The Children on the Porch – Dona Fox

All the Children on the Porch: a short horror story

Another exquisitely creepy read from Dona Fox. I love these shorts, they are written with a depth and expertise that’s hard to find. I can only hope to write something half as good one day.

This starts pretty innocent and simple, but quickly develops into a tragic story of family and the dark secrets within. I can’t say too much as I really wouldn’t want to spoil the ending, or the build up, but my word it’s a good one.

It is another really quick read, about 20-30 minutes. Perfect for those train journeys and lunch breaks at work. It has a quick pace. great characterization and depth and is one I feel I could read over and over and still be surprised and horrified.

It’s truly quite shocking, down to the last line.

“I like mine bloody. I get whatever I want now; I’m not a child anymore”.

A Perfect Memory – Dona Fox

A Perfect Memory: a short horror story

This is yet again a wonderfully intricate story from Dona Fox. A Perfect Memory sucks you in, chews you up and spits you back out ten fold. A very clever piece of twisted psychological horror. You never quite quite know what’s real or who is who. I’m still a little unsure. A chilling tale of identity and government secrets from start to finish.

It is put together with such perfection down the last detail. The characters are woven deeply into the plot with a level of writing ability one could only hope to aspire to.

There is so much involved for such a short piece. I really am in awe of the writing of Dona Fox.

The Bledbrooke Works

The Bledbrooke Works

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John F. Leonard

5/5

A new story from the Scaeth Mythos, The Bledbrooke Works does not disappoint.

I love reading these stories, John F. Leonard has a talent for subtle horror yet disturbing all the same. The Bledbrooke Works I feel is one of the subtlest yet. I was engaged with the two characters from the onset. Donald Hobdike, a cranky older gentleman who resents youth, yet at the same time he resents getting old. He is tasked with wayward youth Michael Bassey, ‘Mikey B’, who is sent to Hobdike to work of his debt to society.

Hobdike takes Mikey down under Bledbrooke, into the sewage system to search for what could be a ‘fatberg’ – A fatberg is a congealed mass in a sewer system formed by the combination of non-biodegradable solid matter, such as wet wipes, and congealed grease or cooking fat. –Thank you Wikipedia for that definition. As they work their way through the darkness and stench of the towns waste Mikey begins to get nervous. He thinks he feels something touch him in the water. He sees shadows and movement. Things that cannot be real, that cannot exist. Hobdike tells him it’s just the darkness; being so far below the surface can have an effect on people – A plausible explanation. Mixed with being soaking wet after a tumble into the sewage, and too hot from the unnatural humidity down there, Mikey could almost accept that he was just being paranoid, almost.

The truth of the matter is far worse. It’s no fatberg at the end of the tunnel.

This book goes from ‘normal’ to creepy in one giant monster leap. The twist, the payoff, I have to admit I had no idea. The best way of course is when you are taken completely by surprise. The Bledbrooke Works reeled me in good. Hooking me from the start with believable characters, a musty old sewage works and some dark and smelly tunnels (and of course my favourite, a mention of rats).

It is such a simple yet effective setting, old factories and ageing buildings are ready-made for horror stories. They have unlimited potential, as John shows in his writing, with an atmosphere of suspense and horror built into them from their creation.

The sights, sounds and smells were all but palpable. John really has a knack for descriptiveness. You can almost envision yourself there, walking though the ripe narrow passages behind Hobdike and Mikey, as well as suffering the claustrophobia and paranoia that Mikey feels.

I felt there were undertones of the harsh realities of ageing within the story. Hobdike, not the young whippersnapper he used to be, being somewhat resentful of Mikey’s youth. He recognises himself in Mikey, something I feel we all do as we get older, we see the younger generation making the same mistakes as we did, yet we still hold contempt and criticise in what becomes an infinite loop. He isn’t ready to grow old and retire. He doesn’t want to die. Who does of course? But some things are meant to be. The symmetry between young Mikey and old Hobdike at the end I feel validated my thoughts on this with a somewhat ‘passing the torch’ moment.

“Michael Bassey, a blundering boy, crippled by circumstance. Packed with potential and denied opportunity. A horrible reality for the vast majority of the underprivileged in the modern era. This vicious circle that kept the underclass confined to poverty. Wedged and forever stuck at the bottom of the pile.”

The Bledbrooke Works is yet another fantastic story from The Scaeth Mythos. John F. Leonard just keeps coming back with all things subtle and scary; I swear they get better and better.

5/5

Master of Pain – ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Book Review

Master of Pain, this is one for the extreme horror/genre fans. It is extremely graphic in the content, sex, violence and BDSM. It is far from one for the sensitive/faint of heart.

Melanie has always been attracted to assertive, dominant , alpha males. She has always been curious about sadism and masochism, bondage, and submission, but when she meets a man on an online BDSM website, who calls himself SLAVEMASTER, she will experience a level of sadomasochism the goes far beyond safe, sane, and consensual. Inspired by the true story of America’s first online serial killer. From the twisted minds of Wrath James White and Kristopher Rufty, comes a story of extreme violence, sex, perversion, and the occult.


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/45421126-master-of-pain

Master of Pain is inspired by the internet serial killer, John Edward Robinson.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Edward_Robinson

It’s a well written story, abet a little on the graphic side and far too much sex for me, but I accept that this is all needed as it is based on a true life sex killer. The characters have many layers and provoke a rapid response in the reader. The offset between the killer and Melanie works very well, such different temperaments and lifestyles. They compliment each other wonderfully.

This is a good, yet tough, read if you are a fan of the more extreme genre and true crime/serial killer works.

Ghost Mine – ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Book Review

Many thanks first of all to Flame Tree Press for the copy of Ghost Mine by Hunter Shea. This is part of the Flame Tree Press May releases.

Ghost Mine is a cowboy/gold rush/Djinn mash up which does work really well for the most part.

Teddy Roosevelt wants the gold from the mining town of Hecla, the problem… well Hecla seems to swallow men whole. He decides his man from the Rough Rider days, Nat, now an NYC cop is the man for the job and sends him in to see what exactly is going on there. Taking is long time friend and fellow adopted Rough Rider, Teta, with him they head out to the unknown.

My favourite thing about this book is Teta, he is a fantastic character. You can feel his sassy energy bouncing of the page and his little digs and quips really worked for me. I hate to say that Nat on the other hand, felt a little, robotic (if thats the right term). For me this let the book down a bit. It’s a great story, and the Wild West setting is wonderful – I love a good western. Sadly the majority of the characters just took the shine off. Selma too, I found her quite irksome for the most part.

The story itself is rather good, opening in Hecla with the naughty kid Billy killing rats in the mines. It seems that something down there did not want to be disturbed and it definitely made itself known. I enjoyed the subtlety of the opening chapter, setting the story up whilst being very tight-lipped about the while ‘what’s down there’.

Ghost Mine is definitely worth a read. As always it’s a very subjective matter. Yes, I couldn’t quite get there with it, but all the same it’s a well set up plot, and Teta who I’ve already gushed over is great!!

Released May 30th 2019 from Flame Tree Press

Ghost Mine (Fiction Without Frontiers) https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1787582078/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_gWs2CbE6KQ2GQ

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